Heavy rain resilience of small and medium-sized communities promoted by the project LIFE LOCAL ADAPT

19:00 Tuesday 28 May

PO181

PS16

 

Majana Heidenreich (Germany) 1; Bettina Fischer (Austria) 2; Adelheid Weiland (Austria) 2; Dominic Rumpf (Germany) 3; Caterina Joseph (Germany) 3; Barbara Köstner (Germany) 1; Christian Bernhofer (Germany) 1

1 - Chair of Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden); 2 - Provincial Government of Styria, Technical Department for Energy Technology and Climate Protection; 3 - Saxon State Office for Environment, Agriculture and Geology (LfULG), Department Climate and Air Quality

There is an urgent need to address adaptation to the current and future impacts of climate change at the local level. Unlike large cities, which usually have sufficient structural, financial and human resources to respond to new conditions, this is not the case for smaller communities that are challenged in different ways. The EU project LIFE LOCAL ADAPT aims to support these small and medium-sized communities. Many of them already experienced serious damage from heavy rain events, and climatic analyses show that the risk of heavy rain continues to increase. This requires strategies and measures to reduce the adverse effects of heavy rain – the improvement of heavy rain resilience.

The chosen approach is to offer the communities consulting, knowledge transfer by workshops, information material and online platforms as well as financial support through a contest in parallel. The contest rewarded the best concepts of adaptation measures tailored to the needs of the communities and the project finances and accompanies the planning phase of the measures, which helps the communities to implement these measures on their own.

One example is the development of a master plan for the city of Zittau in Saxony to increase heavy rain resilience of the sewer system. We summarise the most important recommendations, best practice examples of physical, administrative and social measures of the regions Saxony in Germany and Styria in Austria.